Will Going Gluten Free Cause Weight Loss?

nutrition

Will Going Gluten Free Cause Weight Loss?

Although people have been eating wheat for thousands of years, one third of US adults now shun foods containing wheat in an effort to avoid gluten.

“…blaming gluten for weight gain draws a flawed conclusion.”

But what is gluten? And is it worthy of this tarnished reputation?

Thomas Campbell, family physician and medical director of the University of Rochester Medicine Weight Management & Lifestyle Center at Highland Hospital, explains:

Q

It seems like you don’t have to go very far to find a person who has given up eating bread and pasta because they contain gluten. What is gluten and why has it earned such a bad name?

A

Gluten is a combination of proteins found in all wheat, barley, and rye products. It’s a key component that contributes to the texture and taste of bread. And it’s become a popular target of criticism, blamed for ailments ranging from stomach distress to joint pain to dementia. While there are some people who must avoid gluten because they have Celiac disease (more on that later), it’s not necessary for most.

Some people do find that, when they avoid eating foods with gluten, they lose weight and feel better. Americans eat a lot of wheat products and 90 percent of them are refined grains—found in white breads, desserts, pizza, and pasta, for example. When people want to lose weight, they often start by reducing their intake of these foods, replacing them with more nutritious choices. They may drop a few pounds and begin feeling better as a result of a healthier diet, but attribute it to avoiding gluten rather than cutting out empty calories in processed foods. In light of that, for many people, giving up gluten has become a fashionable diet strategy.

While it’s certainly not wrong to replace processed foods with healthier choices like fruits and vegetables, blaming gluten for weight gain draws a flawed conclusion. You may lose weight and feel better, but it’s more than likely due to eating healthier foods than it is to cutting out gluten.

Q

What is Celiac disease and why do so many people seem to have it?

A

Gluten can wreak havoc in people with Celiac disease which, despite the fact we hear about it frequently, is relatively uncommon. Celiac disease affects an estimated 1 percent of our population. It’s an autoimmune disease—which happens when the immune system attacks healthy cells in the body by mistake—and, when people who have it eat gluten, it destroys the lining of their gut. As a result, nutrients in food are not absorbed properly.

Signs and symptoms can be severe, including pain, diarrhea, osteoporosis, and anemia. Your doctor can test for Celiac disease using a blood test and, ultimately, patients can confirm the diagnosis with a biopsy.

More prevalent are people concerned with non-Celiac gluten sensitivities (NCGS). People with NCGS may have bad reactions when they eat gluten, such as gas, bloating, fatigue, brain fog, joint aches, skin problems, and depression. Symptoms of NCGS may overlap with those of other gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A recent study estimated that 30 percent of people with IBS were sensitive to gluten, but most of these people were also sensitive to dairy and other foods.

There are no good data on the prevalence of NCGS, but it is likely to be less common than people would believe. In fact, recent studies have found that many of those following a gluten-free diet because of concerns about NCGS don’t actually have any symptoms related to gluten when given a blinded dietary challenge.

Q

Those statistics don’t seem to account for the number of people who say they can’t tolerate gluten. Gluten-free foods are now found in abundance on many restaurant menus and supermarket shelves. Could the problem be worse than medical experts realize?

A

Good medical practice is founded on solid scientific evidence, so the lack of evidence related to gluten sensitivity suggests that the issue is most likely overblown.

While there definitely is evidence for gluten sensitivity, the trend is to blame just about everything on gluten. The proliferation of gluten-free products today is not unlike the burst of low-carbohydrate or carb-free products marketed when low-carb came into vogue. (One recent statistic claims that sales of gluten-free products will exceed $15 billion by 2016.) However, their popularity says more about food manufacturers responding to a trend than it does about what we actually know regarding gluten sensitivity in our population.

That said, if you haven’t been diagnosed with Celiac or NCGS but decide to reduce or eliminate gluten from your diet, I would urge you to replace it with more plant-based foods and items that are not processed rather than foods manufactured to be gluten-free, like gluten-free chips or cookies.

Q

Is there any evidence that more people are developing gluten sensitivity?

A

Many people who report being sensitive to gluten are also sensitive to other foods, such as dairy products. This suggests that there may be an issue larger than gluten that we need to understand. What we do know is that most of the gluten in our diets comes from highly processed foods, which are unhealthy for a number of reasons. Without a doubt, more study is needed to investigate how gluten may impact our health.

Q

Since there seems to be a lot unknown about this, what is the takeaway message you have to offer people who may have concerns about gluten in their diets?

A

First and foremost, Celiac disease is very serious and if you’re diagnosed with it, you should follow your doctor’s instructions carefully when it comes to what you can and cannot eat. If you don’t have it but believe you have symptoms related to eating gluten, you may have non-Celiac gluten sensitivity, though it’s not nearly as prevalent as some believe. Again, it’s best to talk with your health care provider and work together to learn what may be causing your symptoms.

Rather than focusing on what not to eat, I prefer to emphasize what you should include in your daily meals. Overall, most people will gain health benefits from eating:

  • More plant-based foods (vegetables, fruits, legumes)
  • More fiber-rich foods (whole grains in addition to plant-based items)
  • Limited amounts of dairy and meat products.

A low-fat, plant-based diet has been proven to reduce heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases while promoting good health outcomes.

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Living gluten-free is not a whole lot of fun, but at least April has managed to make it funny. Gluten Is My Bitch is a brutally honest, entertaining look at what living a gluten-free life entails. As an antidote to the tragic news that, no, you will never eat regular donuts again, April provides 40 gluten-free comfort food recipes and a bonus 20 new recipes in the paperback edition that will make even the most frustrated gluten-intolerant smile with relief. In the new paperback, April addresses the challenges of sustaining a gluten-free lifestyle once you’ve transitioned from the gluten-filled world. With updated resources and brand-new recipes for everyday meals, the paperback offers a complete look at living gluten-free for life.




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The bestselling authors of the groundbreaking Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day bring you a new cookbook with 90 delicious, entirely gluten-free bread recipes made from easy-to-find ingredients.

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Based on overwhelming requests from their readers, Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François have returned to their test kitchens to create an entirely gluten-free bread cookbook―most of the recipes that readers loved in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day appear here in a gluten-free version. In just five minutes a day of active preparation time, you can create delectable, gluten-free Sandwich loaves. European Peasant Bread, 100% Whole Grain Loaves, French Baguettes, Crock Pot Bread, Caraway "Rye" Bread, Challah, and even fabulous dessert breads like Brioche, Doughnuts, and Sticky Pecan Caramel Rolls.

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Eat Happy: Gluten Free, Grain Free, Low Carb Recipes Made from Real Foods For A Joyful Life

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In 2012, after almost ten years of being gluten free due to celiac, Anna Vocino found she was gaining weight faster than a tick on a labradoodle. Turns out the culprit wasnt overeating or too much fat in the diet, but the pesky sugars and grains in all those gluten free comfort foods. When Anna started podcasting with Fitness Confidential author Vinnie Tortorich, she adapted her entire way of eating to go what Tortorich coined: NSNGNo Sugars No Grains. Sure enough, the weight dropped off, the inflammation due to celiac finally calmed down, and for the first time in her life, she learned what it meant to be truly happy about food.


All of Annas recipes are delicious, easy to make, and so satisfying, you wont even know youre eating healthy. Craving rich, decadent chocolate pots with fresh cream that are delicious but not fattening? Wanna make a grain-free pizza crust that actually helps you lose weight? Dying for pancakes, but youve committed to avoiding carbs? How about hearty shepherds pie, tater tots, sizzling ginger rice, all made with cauliflower instead of high carb rice and potatoes? Eat Happy offers low carb comfort foods to please the entire family.





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