Are Low Calorie Sweeteners Really Better For You?

health

Are Low Calorie Sweeteners Really Better For You?
Photo Credit: Steve Snodgrass. (CC 2.0)

Drinking beverages containing low-calorie sweeteners may not help you lose weight and may even be bad for your health, according to new research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The researchers, who reviewed a number of studies, found that people who regularly consume low-calorie sweeteners (such as aspartame, sucralose and stevioside) tend have a higher risk of long-term weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease than those who don’t.

Obesity is a growing, global problem, and excess sugar consumption is suspected of being a major factor in this grim trajectory. In an effort to avoid the health consequences of consuming too much sugar, people have been switching to low-calorie sweeteners. Consumption of these sweeteners has increased significantly in recent years, and the trend is expected to continue.

However, a number of recent studies – including animal studies – have suggested that low-calorie sweeteners may not be that good for your health. For example, there is some evidence that they may negatively affect glucose metabolism, gut microbes and appetite control. But small, individual studies don’t always give a complete picture. In order to get a better idea of what low-calorie sweeteners are doing to our health, the researchers in this latest study conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis. This means they pooled data from the best studies they could find and re-analysed the combined data in order to generate more reliable statistics.

For their review, the researchers analysed data from seven randomised controlled trials (the “gold standard” for clinical studies) and 30 observational studies. In all, the studies included 400,000 participants.

The trials, which included 1,003 participants who were followed for an average of six months, showed no consistent evidence that low-calorie sweeteners helped people manage their weight. The observational studies, which followed people for an average of ten years, found that people who regularly drank low-calorie sweetened drinks (one or more drinks a day) had an increased risk of moderate weight gain, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and heart disease (including stroke).

Randomised controlled trials can prove that one thing causes another, but observational studies can only show an association between things. So we need to treat the findings from observational studies with more caution, as there may be other factors (known as “confounders”) that explain the associations. For example, it is possible that heavier people consume drinks with low-calorie sweeteners to try and lose weight, rather than that the consumption of these drinks cause an increase in weight.

The review also only looked at beverages that contained low-calorie sweeteners, not at the intake of these sweeteners in other foods. Nowadays, low-calorie sweeteners are found in a range of foods, including yogurts, sauces, baked goods and “health bars”. Many brands of toothpaste also contain them. It’s possible that the people in the observational studies who declared that they never drank beverages containing low-calorie sweeteners consumed these sweeteners in other foods.

How does it compare with sugar?

Unfortunately, none of the studies in the review compared consuming low-calorie sweetened drinks with sugary drinks. What is clear from earlier studies is that there is a close parallel between the rise in sugar consumption and increases in global obesity. And other studies have found that consuming sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, independent of weight.

It has become increasingly clear: sugar is very bad for your health. So it seems logical to assume that if high calorie sugar is replaced with low-calorie sweetener then we reduce the risk of weight gain, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. What this latest study suggests is that this may not be the case.

The ConversationThe evidence against low-calorie sweeteners may not be watertight, but, if the latest review is correct, it might be best if we avoided them. Maybe we’ll just have to wean ourselves off sweet-tasting foods altogether, regardless of what they’re sweetened with.

About The Author

Rachel Adams, Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Related Books:

Sweet Poison: How the World's Most Popular Artificial Sweetener Is Killing Us — My Story

healthAuthor: Janet Starr Hull
Binding: Paperback
Studio: New Horizon Press
Label: New Horizon Press
Publisher: New Horizon Press
Manufacturer: New Horizon Press

Buy Now
Editorial Review:
When certified nutritionist Janet Hull became gravely ill, she discovered aspartame poisioning was to blame for her life threatening sickness. Her investigation revealed disturbing facts about aspartame hidden from the public since the 1970's — including documents contradicting product safety and the fact that aspartame was originally approved as a drug — not a food additive. She tells her story and the experiences of others and unveils startling evidence of a cover-up.




Empty Pleasures: The Story of Artificial Sweeteners from Saccharin to Splenda

healthAuthor: Carolyn de la Peña
Binding: Paperback
Studio: The University of North Carolina Press
Label: The University of North Carolina Press
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Manufacturer: The University of North Carolina Press

Buy Now
Editorial Review: Sugar substitutes have been a part of American life since saccharin was introduced at the 1893 World's Fair. In Empty Pleasures, the first history of artificial sweeteners in the United States, Carolyn de la Pena blends popular culture with business and women's history, examining the invention, production, marketing, regulation, and consumption of sugar substitutes such as saccharin, Sucaryl, NutraSweet, and Splenda. She describes how saccharin, an accidental laboratory by-product, was transformed from a perceived adulterant into a healthy ingredient. As food producers and pharmaceutical companies worked together to create diet products, savvy women's magazine writers and editors promoted artificially sweetened foods as ideal, modern weight-loss aids, and early diet-plan entrepreneurs built menus and fortunes around pleasurable dieting made possible by artificial sweeteners.

NutraSweet, Splenda, and their predecessors have enjoyed enormous success by promising that Americans, especially women, can "have their cake and eat it too," but Empty Pleasures argues that these "sweet cheats" have fostered troubling and unsustainable eating habits and that the promises of artificial sweeteners are ultimately too good to be true.





Artificial Sweeteners: Risks and Effects

healthAuthor: C.D. Shelton
Binding: Kindle Edition
Format: Kindle eBook
Studio: Choice PH
Label: Choice PH
Publisher: Choice PH
Manufacturer: Choice PH

Buy Now
Editorial Review: The calories contained in sugar-sweetened beverages contributes to increases in body weight and body fat, and replacement of sugar by artificial sweeteners reduces weight, but this weight reduction comes with some negative components.

The majority of sugar substitutes approved for food use are artificially synthesized compounds. However, there is a cost to using artificial sweeteners. For example, women who are looking to shave a few calories off of an already “over abundant diet”, particularly if you are of child-bearing age could be passing on a sentence of obesity to your child.This eBook will look at the hazards one may unwittingly be taking by using artificial sweeteners in their daily diet.






health
enafarzh-CNzh-TWtlfrdehiiditjamsptrues

follow InnerSelf on

google-plus-iconfacebook-icontwitter-iconrss-icon

 Get The Latest By Email

{emailcloak=off}

follow InnerSelf on

google-plus-iconfacebook-icontwitter-iconrss-icon

 Get The Latest By Email

{emailcloak=off}